Archive for January, 2008

Jan 30 2008

Taking a Break

Published by under General

Thank you for your donation Ian. 🙂

Sorry I haven’t posted for a while. I have been running a course and coming back I find myself in complete lack of inspiration.

My plan is to have a book finished by spring(ish). I’ll devote time to that in the coming months an will not be able to write much on the blog. It may be that I’ll post something every now and then though.

I’ll be moving back south in June and that is probably the earliest time you can expect regular posting here.

Thanks to all my readers and donators!

6 responses so far

Jan 15 2008

Another departure

Published by under Uncategorized

I’m travelling down to the location where I run courses. Have to show up in the home defence army group tommorrow, but I hope I’ll manage to be on location by tommorrow.
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3 responses so far

Jan 13 2008

Patching Wool

Published by under Animal Materials

Purist Warning! This post contains non-primitive tools. 🙂

What you need to do this:

  • A wool garnment with holes in it.
  • A blunt, preferably large needle with a big eye.
  • Some wool thread. Preferably matching colours, though I didn’t have that available..

Knitted and felted wool is two of the most common materials for traditional clothes in Norway. Wool is warm, even when wet, but it has one disadvantage: It wears out quickly if used in tasks that abrades it heavily. Because of this it’s smart to know how to patch them.

The whole process is organised as when weaving cloth. Start by making threads going in one direction. Use simple overhand stitches, but don’t tighten them together.

woolmittens1.JPG

Then you weave like on a loom. Remember that there are threads on the inside too, that needs to be incorporated. This is a little fiddely, but if you poke around a little in the hole with the needle you’ll find them. Feel on the inside as well, to make it easier. The first row is the hardest.

woolmittens2.JPGwoolmittens3.JPG

There is no need to make any knots at the beginning or end of the weave. Just make a few additional stitches. It’s remarkable quick to patch a pair of mittens, socks or whatever.

woolmittens4.JPG

Just for your information, I am crappy at patching wool, as you probably can see it looks like a mess. It does the job though.

2 responses so far

Jan 12 2008

Chat on the Forum

Published by under General

Flashchat has now been installed and is seamlessly integrated with the forum. This way you can always see if there are some people in the chat from the forum and move back and forth between the forum and the chat.

No responses yet

Jan 12 2008

Buckskin Bag Part 3

Published by under Animal Materials

I have made a little progress on my buckskin bag. I have made a carrying strap (not attached yet) and stitched on the fur strip from part 2.

Buckskin strips cut. These have been stitched together after this photo was taken and is ready to be assembled on the bag.

straps2.JPG

The fur strip was stitched on from the middle and out to both sides, to reduce risk of unwanted folds. In the ends I folded over the fur to make it look a little more seamless.

bagfur1.JPG

Run a needle or awl along the seams to try to catch and pull out any hairs sticking in the holes or underneath the stitches.

bagfur2.JPG

The first strip is now attached. I stitched all the way around it. I am planning on adding two more tomorrow, given that I have the time for it.

bagfur3.JPG

3 responses so far

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